IN ODD WE TRUST
ODD things are happening at SoulStorm 
Brewery.  It seems that the greedy
Glukkons are using Mudokon tears as
a key ingrdient in their best selling
beverage, Soulstorm Brew.  And they'll
stop at nothing to get them, for
torturing the Mudokons is their preferred
lifestyle!  Once again, it's up to Abe to save
his race, with just his loin-cloth, chants and wits.
Not to mention a bad case of gas.  Sound ODD?
Welcome back to Oddworld.
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STORY

When we last saw Abe, he'd just rescued ninety-nine Mudokans
from RuptoreFarms, and struck a serious blow to the Glukkons
of the rapacious Magaog Cartel.  Once an ignorant, happy floor-
waxer, Abe now found himself a hero to his people.  You might
think Abe had earned a wacation....

....but that was before he fell on his head, and had a vision.
Three restless ghosts let Abe in on a shocking secret.

RuptureFarms was just one of many slaughterhouses the
Glukkons are using to exploit the Mudokons.  Even worse is
the Soulstorm Brewery, where super-addictive
SoulStorm Brew is made from the bones of dead Mudokons
mined from Necrum, the ancient Mudokon city of the dead!

Abe, being a schmuck - uh, hero - set out across the desert
with five friends to find Necrum.  When the game opens,
Abe and his pals have snuck into the Necrum Mines.

Your mission is to destroy the Mines by sabotaging the boilers
that power the place.  You'll have to find your five friends, too...
but keep them away from Soulstorm Brew!  One slug of that stuff
and they'll get sick, and be no use to anyone...unless you can find a
way to heal them.  And how do you do that?  I bet those three
restless ghosts might have an idea.  They're probably hanging
around their tomb.  If you find the ghosts, maybe you can get them to
confirm the rumor that Scrabs and Paramites are running free in the
Vaults of Necrum.

What happens after that is up to you to discover, but if you think you're
going to get off with just blowing up the Mines, you haven't been paying
attention.  Hellish train rides, bone-processing factories, a whole barracks
full of Sligs, and Soulstorm Brewery itself are in your future.  There won't be
a dry eye in the house when you discover the secret ingredient of SoulStorm
Brew.  And oh yeah, it wouldn't be a bad idea to rescue any other Mudokans
you find along the way.  Never know when it will come in handy to have a bunch
of escaped Mudokans to call on.  It sure bailed your fat out of the fire when
Mullock had you hanging over the meat grinders back in RuptureFarms
but that's ancient history.



Review

                              Enemy possession, bone drills and more
                              inhabit the latest offshoot of GT Interactive's
                              burgeoning franchise on the PlayStation.
                              Abe's Exoddus, more of a carryover from last
                              year's Abe's Odyssee than an actual part of
                              the Oddworld quintology, picks up where the
                              original left off in terms of graphics, puzzles
                              and story development. This time around, the
                              alien hero, Abe, must free his fellow
                              Mudokans from the Glukkon Empire's iron fist
                              while destroying the huge mechanical factory
                              in which his people are enslaved. It's a
                              curiously darker take on the classic tale of a
                              hapless underdog who (with a little ingenuity
                              and a lot of help from the player) must fight
                              against the tyrannies of an evil emperor
                              exploiting the peasants for the almighty
                              dollar.

                              To do this, Abe utilizes a host of unusual skills such as 'Gamespeak', rolling
                              around in mine carts, possessing his enemies and his own farts (ick). There's
                              puzzles waiting around every corner which necessitate the use of all of the
                              above skills (and bodily functions) as well as a good share of dexterity on the
                              player's part - often requiring quick thinking and the frequent use of the
                              game's brilliant Quicksave feature. And this is where Abe's Exoddus really
                              flexes its muscles, taxing both your logic and reflexes at the same time. While
                              the game is packed with an abundance of puzzles as well as deathtraps, you
                              may execute either Quicksaves (the game will automatically load from the last
                              Quicksave point) or Memory Card saves (permanent record of your journey)
                              at any point during gameplay. This blessed feature reduces the frustration
                              factor and keeps the game moving at a brisk pace.

                              The careful balance of puzzle and action keeps the gameplay deep and
                              involving while serving up a convincing plot line. There are very few console
                              games that really succeed in pulling off this feat well, but Abe's Exoddus
                              accomplishes it with honors. Consideration must be given to both saving the
                              Mudokans and leading them to safety without being detected, killed or
                              destroyed. Every step in the process takes thoughtful planning in that the
                              path to the warp portal must be cleared of enemies and obstacles, which
                              complicates the process further. Add to this the ability to speak with each
                              Mudokan and appeal to their individual needs, such as verbally guiding
                              Blind Mudokans or sympathizing with the suicidal Mudokans, and it's easy
                              to recognize that Exoddus delivers a vastly complex and intricate experience.

                              But all is not peachy in the realm of gameplay for Exoddus. As a sequel,
                              Exoddus merely builds upon its predecessor's themes and only slightly
                              expands upon them with varied Gamespeak and a few new features. While for
                              fans this is what's to be expected from sequels that appear on the same
                              console as the original, this doesn't make up for the fact that Abe's Exoddus
                              seems to recycle many of its backgrounds from Odyssee. Though the
                              backgrounds appear painstakingly detailed and stand as among the best in
                              2D, there's not enough variety in environments to set it apart from the
                              original, or even the differing levels within the game.

                              Though the backgrounds are not necessarily the meat of Exoddus, the
                              controls for maneuvering Abe around tricky spots is much more an integral
                              part of gameplay. And the controls could stand to flow more smoothly,
                              especially when moving Abe up and down ledges. When the main thing that
                              stands between Abe and certain death is a steep set of platforms that must
                              be traversed quickly, your best bet is to always Quicksave to avoid the
                              inevitable frustration of running, stopping, squatting, then moving over, then
                              squatting, then moving over... Well, you get the idea. Even the most adept
                              Oddworld fanatic will have to agree that precision in controls is an
                              understatement when approaching such obstacles.

                              But even the questionable controls in certain areas and an overly familiar set
                              of backgrounds can't put a deep dent in the solid gameplay of Exoddus. With
                              important ingredients like an immersive plot line to ingenious puzzle
                              segments, GT Interactive and Oddworld Inhabitants provide 2D platformer
                              fans with one of the most clever and challenging titles to emerge this holiday
                              season.


Oddworld Exoddus Walkthrough